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Author Topic: [Poll: 2013.6 ]: Is blending ethanol (up to 10%) into gasoline (E10) a good i... Back to Topics
JT

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Message Posted: Feb 3, 2013 12:01:00 AM

Is blending ethanol (up to 10%) into gasoline (E10) a good idea?
Yes
No
No opinion

Post your thoughts about this poll below.
REPLIES (newest first) Post a Reply
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RZF350
Rookie Author Tacoma

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Message Posted: May 7, 2014 10:19:58 PM

Yes/No

Ethanol works well with some vehicles but not with others. The owner should have the option to choose.
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dojomcd
Rookie Author California

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Message Posted: Feb 13, 2014 6:07:46 PM

YES- it has never hurt my cars. I've heard that the two liquids will separate if left sitting for a year or so. Creating a gum that will clog your injectors.
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123Bucks
Sophomore Author Detroit

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Message Posted: Aug 28, 2013 9:21:21 PM

No opinion
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HFAJR0034
Champion Author New Mexico

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Message Posted: Jun 7, 2013 8:19:50 AM

n
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snirt
Champion Author Anchorage

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Message Posted: Jun 3, 2013 12:50:59 AM

No
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imlefty
Champion Author Maine

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Message Posted: May 13, 2013 4:25:51 PM

no
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awesomedream
Rookie Author Seattle

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Message Posted: May 11, 2013 1:39:49 PM

NO

more corn = less miles per gallon and damages engine more money to oil companies.

no corn = better mileage and lower food prices


[Edited by: awesomedream at 5/11/2013 1:41:50 PM EST]
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sportyclassic
Rookie Author Toronto

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Message Posted: May 9, 2013 9:53:47 AM

As mentioned by others there are pros and cons depending on ones perspective. I have some (not all) pros and cons.

Pros: It is an octane booster replacing mtbe, lead and others.
It can/is made from several types organic (not like the supermarket) materials such as corn

Cons: It lowers fuel economy (ethanol has app.30% less energy than gasoline) Simply put you have to burn more to go the same distance given identical operating parameters.
Ethanol binds with water and is prone to phase separation (google it), Accelerates corrosion in metal tanks and fuel systems not designed for it. Is not suitable for older boats especially those with fiberglass tanks.



[Edited by: sportyclassic at 5/9/2013 9:55:28 AM EST]
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sonicmustang
All-Star Author Alberta

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Message Posted: May 4, 2013 7:30:25 AM

No opinion
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HFAJR0034
Champion Author New Mexico

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Message Posted: May 4, 2013 7:15:56 AM

n
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FamilyTrucksterMO
Rookie Author St. Louis

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Message Posted: May 2, 2013 1:14:48 PM

Yes. As I recall, E10 was brought about to replace the MTBE additive. E10 is less destructive than the MTBE additive.
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HFAJR0034
Champion Author New Mexico

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Message Posted: Apr 5, 2013 1:20:30 PM

n
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jjvw2013
Rookie Author Michigan

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Message Posted: Apr 3, 2013 10:47:56 AM

E10 is the reason for the recall on dodge gas tanks. The seal used in the fuel shut off valve is compromised by the ethanol. The fuel backs up during refueling and runs all over your hands and clothing creating a health and fire hazard.

Many off our motorcycle friends are reporting carb problems caused by E10. We only have 20,000 miles on ours, so it isn't a problem yet.
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Gas_Eyes
Champion Author Dallas

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Message Posted: Mar 30, 2013 9:24:39 AM

We need to get away from over reliance of ethanol made from corn. Reduce ethanol mandate to 5 percent.
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iwannavet
Champion Author Kitchener-Waterloo

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Message Posted: Mar 27, 2013 8:55:45 AM

Not if food crops are used to produce the ethanol
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razorwan
Rookie Author Atlanta

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Message Posted: Mar 26, 2013 8:12:17 PM

We've been running that mix for years and it's never been an issue. I think that's what lead to E85. I'm not a scientist so I don't really know.
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TTCM4X4
Rookie Author Twin Cities

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Message Posted: Mar 22, 2013 10:44:46 AM

No. In mileage comparisons, a vehicle running E85 compared to that running on pure gasoline suffers a 25% reduction in gas mileage, leading to increased consumption. Unless the E85 price is 25% lower than regular unleaded, you are paying more than you should to go the same distance. In midwestern states along the corn belt, E85 is cheaper but where I am (NM), it costs the same as regular unleaded. Not a good choice economically. Costs are generally high, availability nationwide is generally low, therefore its ability reduce dependency of foreign oil is insignificant.
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Banjoe
Champion Author Winnipeg

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Message Posted: Mar 21, 2013 8:58:58 AM

It's a very good idea. We've been running that mix for years and it's never been an issue.
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LonghornBubba
Champion Author Houston

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Message Posted: Mar 21, 2013 7:21:42 AM

no
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Gas_Eyes
Champion Author Dallas

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Message Posted: Mar 20, 2013 8:21:47 AM

No E15.
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jdevlin
All-Star Author Ontario

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Message Posted: Mar 18, 2013 8:09:06 AM

get rid of ethanol in gas.
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DORELBC
Rookie Author Abbotsford

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Message Posted: Mar 16, 2013 4:38:55 PM

I read that up to 10% is not hurting the engine , but over that .... is baddd !
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Jeeputtputt
Champion Author Ohio

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Message Posted: Mar 14, 2013 5:28:32 PM

are u a dummy? NO!!!
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NakedDriver
Champion Author Des Moines

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Message Posted: Mar 10, 2013 2:06:22 PM

ə good in some ways, bad in others.
good in that it helps agriculture and maintains a lower fuel cost.
bad in that we are using food (corn) to produce it inefficiently, and for its deleterious effects on the engine plus its lower heat content.
i chose “yes” since there is nothing in between. ə

[Edited by: NakedDriver at 3/10/2013 2:06:50 PM EST]
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RZF350
Rookie Author Tacoma

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Message Posted: Mar 9, 2013 5:48:09 PM

No. It makes your gas engine less fuel efficient and damages any rubber parts in the system. It also evaporates leaving junk in you gas.
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ToyotaNV
Rookie Author Nevada

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Message Posted: Mar 9, 2013 4:42:19 PM

Since this blend was passed by the government, there's serious probability it has lined somebody's pockets. Who thinks that pockets lining of some federal government crook's "pardner" is a good idea? Not me.
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pawnkingfour
Champion Author Georgia

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Message Posted: Mar 8, 2013 7:00:44 PM

No.
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tioga28
Rookie Author Ohio

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Message Posted: Mar 8, 2013 3:20:08 AM

think about it takes oil to make fertlizer, diesel, to plant and harvest, truck to get to market , so how is ethanol green
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Samsplace5022
Rookie Author Tucson

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Message Posted: Mar 4, 2013 10:32:36 AM

no
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beachguy46
Veteran Author Miami

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Message Posted: Mar 2, 2013 10:24:39 PM

it causes extreme damage in older cars, trucks and boats. The alcohol eats away rubber seals in carbureators and dissolves the lining in gas tanks. The emulsified leftovers from this process clog carbureators, make valves stick, clog fuel jets and dissolve fuel lines.
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esmith512
Rookie Author Oklahoma City

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Message Posted: Mar 2, 2013 9:54:12 PM

Short answer: no.Long answer:Ethanol/gasoline blending is a very old idea that still doesn't work very well.

The idea and practice of blending ethanol with gasoline (and flex fuel cars generally) have been around as long as gasoline cars. The Ford Model T was a flex-fuel vehicle and ethanol blended stations have been around in various areas as long as fuel stations have existed. The intention to reduce or replace nonrenewable fossil fuels with renewable fuel sources is very attractive, but for nearly the past century in the U.S. has proven to be be logistically, physically, economically, and politically difficult and impractical. Due to various business reasons among the U.S. car manufacturers, gasohol damages or destroys engines in most U.S. domestic cars manufactured more than eight to ten years ago or earlier. Current U.S. domestic cars are more resistant to ethanol-induced damage than their older counterparts and their engines cost slightly more to produce to enable this durability, but are still degraded/damaged by ethanol/gasoline blends. Until U.S. domestic engines can tolerate pure ethanol and water ingestion without damage, any and all ethanol fuels will be deleterious to U.S. domestic cars and lead to premature failures compared to "pure 100%" gasoline (quoted because it is never pure or 100%--it too has additives and oxygenates).
For the current U.S. infrastructure and culture, Ethanol/gasoline blends are ultimately more expensive and disruptive than "100% pure" gasoline and represent a net detriment (a negation of benefit).

The much bigger problem with ethanol blends today is logistical and economic. Without federal subsidies, the real price of E10 fuel in the U.S. would be about $12 a gallon. The energy required to render the ethanol fuel exceeds the energy it imparts to the vehicle using it--every drop of ethanol in fuel represents a slight energy loss in the current grand scheme of things. Ethanol also has a lower energy density than gasoline, requiring up to 20% more ethanol than the same amount of gasoline to realize the same amount of engine power and travel utility. U.S. ethanol stocks are rendered from corn. (Brazil uses more efficient sugar cane for ethanol rendering, but for business and political reasons the U.S. prefers corn). The removal of corn for ethanol production raises the cost of all other corn-based products (mainly animal feeds and corn-based foods), and increases the price of corn and any other product where corn was used.

The net result is that ethanol/gasoline blended fuel in the U.S. fuel system is a very long-standing and well-intentioned idea that ultimately increases our costs of living by increasing our food costs while rendering an unstable and less energetic fuel which reduces the life of our cars.
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dashngas
Rookie Author Birmingham

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Message Posted: Mar 1, 2013 10:56:00 PM

it like watering down a drink the more water the less potent n tears up a motor



[Edited by: dashngas at 3/1/2013 10:58:23 PM EST]
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BUTTERBEAN1960
Rookie Author Texas

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Message Posted: Feb 27, 2013 4:53:39 PM

no all it does is evaporate your gas so you have to stop to buy more

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BUTTERBEAN1960
Rookie Author Texas

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Message Posted: Feb 27, 2013 4:51:34 PM

no all it does is evaporate your gas so you have to stop to buy more

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BUTTERBEAN1960
Rookie Author Texas

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Message Posted: Feb 27, 2013 4:51:29 PM

no all it does is evaporate your gas so you have to stop to buy more

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BUTTERBEAN1960
Rookie Author Texas

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Message Posted: Feb 27, 2013 4:51:27 PM

no all it does is evaporate your gas so you have to stop to buy more

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Gas_Eyes
Champion Author Dallas

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Message Posted: Feb 27, 2013 11:20:14 AM

Ethanol from corn is not really green.
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#12#_JkSparro5
Rookie Author New Jersey

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Message Posted: Feb 26, 2013 5:45:56 PM

no, not a fan of food for gas regardless of the small/high percentage.
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walrus1951
Rookie Author Michigan

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Message Posted: Feb 26, 2013 3:55:28 PM

It's already been proven a bad blend for your car ...NO WAY !!!
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Bqqmpa1
Rookie Author Tennessee

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Message Posted: Feb 23, 2013 11:10:54 AM

Hope all gas stations have a separate pump for E-85 marked FOOLS FILL UP HERE
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Bqqmpa1
Rookie Author Tennessee

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Message Posted: Feb 23, 2013 11:03:06 AM

The government tries to do the right thing by adding ethanol but they always fail miserably. Corn prices have gone up since ethanol was mandated and subsidized. Food has gone up also. It attracts moisture. Ethanol costs more to make than gasoline. Lower mileage.
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Gas_Eyes
Champion Author Dallas

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Message Posted: Feb 22, 2013 3:44:39 PM

With the drought last summer, corn use for ethanol for cars created a problem for cattle ranchers. We need a different way to make ethanol that is environmentally friendly.
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RoadHogg13
Rookie Author Mississippi

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Message Posted: Feb 21, 2013 11:48:13 PM

Not sure...with all the changes there are to vehichle motors I am really not sure what is the best sorce of fuel to be used. Thanks to 'debonairpilot' for explaining the differences between less air-fueled vehicles and higher air-fueled vehicles. Thanks also to 'smoore13' about the changes of fuel production.

In response I have to say the production of gas and the changes to economize with vehicle gas mileage has become a costly expense to the manufacturer and consumer. In my opinion one or both will come out the loser in the end unless something besides GAS/FUEL is found as a new energy.
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serenity4u2
Rookie Author Illinois

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Message Posted: Feb 21, 2013 8:26:25 PM

no
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Gas_Eyes
Champion Author Dallas

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Message Posted: Feb 19, 2013 11:40:11 AM

Ethanol free gas are very difficult to find. The closest one available is 40 miles away.
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debonairpilot
Rookie Author Tampa

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Message Posted: Feb 15, 2013 4:57:00 PM

Internal combustion engines under a light load and burning gasoline typically reach a stoichiometric air fuel mixture ratio of 13:1 but the infinite wisdom of the EPA has increased the ratio to 14:1 thus allowing for catalytic converters beginning in the mid 1970's. Lead was removed from gasoline, which also served to cool the engines during peak cylinder pressures near stoichiometric efficiency thus; other means are required to keep temps down. Today, additives including heptane, alkanes, and MTBE may be added to fuel thus lowering this ratio including the use of ethanol that requires 1 gram of ethanol fuel for every 9 grams of air. Compare that to gasoline, which for every 1 gram of gasoline fuel, 14.7 grams of air is needed for efficient combustion. Since air is cheaper than fuel, it should be obvious that your combustion engine will not be as efficient utilizing any additive of fuel source requiring an air-fuel mixture less than 14:1, thereby lowering your gas mileage. Alcohol also deteriorates any rubber it may come in contact with.

Below is a brief list of potential fuels for combustion engines and their stoichiometric ratios. So you may now ask why do cars still only get 25mpg in the 21st Century? If combustion engines are still the primary mechanism to produce energy, choose a fuel with the highest air-fuel ratio.

Fuel By mass [4] By volume [5] Percent fuel by mass

Gasoline 14.7 : 1 — 6.8%
Natural gas 17.2 : 1 9.7 : 1 5.8%
Propane (LP) 15.67 : 1 23.9 : 1 6.45%
Ethanol 9 : 1 — 11.1%
Methanol 6.47 : 1 — 15.6%
Hydrogen 34.3 : 1 2.39 : 1 2.9%
Diesel 14.5 : 1 0.094 : 1 6.8%

PS...Please note comments when posting if the gas station offers "ethanol free" fuel and price...THANK YOU!
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smoore13
Rookie Author Lincoln

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Message Posted: Feb 15, 2013 10:57:22 AM

Yes,

I know everyone has mixed feelings on the use of ethanol in their fuel. It was suppose to decrease the price of fuel, correct? Well, if we did not have ethanol available as an option to replace a portion (yet it is a small portion) of the oil that is used the price could be a lot higher.
I have been through several ethanol plants and seen the production first hand. It is truly an amazing process. Ethanol plants become more efficient everyday. It may see that we are burning a food source to make fuel replacement source; however, the corn used in the ethanol process is not food grade, rather just field corn.

There are by-products that are also produced in the production of ethanol. If you have a moment search Dry-milling and wet-milling of corn. They are two processes that corn is used to produce ethanol. In addition, the by-products produced are very useful. Distillers grains is one of the main by-products that is produced and is extremely useful in animal diets. The distillers grains provide nutrients that are an essential part of their diets.


[Edited by: smoore13 at 2/15/2013 11:00:32 AM EST]
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GreenflashMD
Sophomore Author Maryland

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Message Posted: Feb 15, 2013 8:31:28 AM

In response to AmynHH whio is waiting for someone to explain the benefits of the use of ethanol -- sorry but to my cynical mind this is ideology and politics run wild. I have read that it takes more energy to make and add ethonol to gasoline than the ethonol saves, which seems understandable to me. And I have also read that the junk put into the air from the combustion of ethonol is worse than that of gasoline.

Someone in this discussion pointed out the ethonol reduces mpg, thereby requiring more gasoline and ethonol mixture to be used to go a given distance and putting more crud in the atmosphere than if the vehicle were usisng straight gasoline.

I would love to see a reasoned defense of using a gasoline and ethonol mixture with facts and figures. Bet it can't be done.
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fiberguy
Champion Author Utah

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Message Posted: Feb 14, 2013 11:18:36 PM

no
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coffeebrake1015
Champion Author Florida

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Message Posted: Feb 14, 2013 7:03:59 PM

no
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